Sunday, 15 March 2009

Latest Global Warming News

Lord Stern admits that his Stern Review on The Economics of Climate Change report may have underestimated the problem......read more
http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/climate-change/lord-stern-on-global-warming-its-even-worse-than-i-thought-1643957.html

Al Gore hopeful that new climate change deal will be reached in Copenhagen later this year...read more
http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/climate-change/gore-says-global-climate-deal-will-be-reached-1645050.html

World water shortage will become a serious problem by 2030....read more
http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/climate-change/water-scarcity-now-bigger-threat-than-financial-crisis-1645358.html

Finally...10 unlikely ways to save the world as climate change accelerates...read more
http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/climate-change/water-scarcity-now-bigger-threat-than-financial-crisis-1645358.html

3 comments:

Toronto Real Estate said...

Nice articles, keep posting. Especially articles about the water shortage. It strikes me as a huge problem but yet nobody pays attention to it. Millions of people don't have a supply of water around the world and yet we're more interested in global warming which is not causing any deaths as far as I know. Thanks for the articles again.

Take care, Julie

simon rosser said...

Hi Julie, thanks for that. Yep, water will become a big problem as global warming melts the mail source of water for milions of people as the Himalayan glaciers start to melt... very sobering! Anyway, how do you receive my blog entries by the way.? cheers,simon.

Bhuvan Chand said...

Combating climate change may not be a question of who will carry the burden but could instead be a rush for the benefits, according to new economic modeling presented at “Climate Change: Global Risks, Challenges & Decisions” hosted by the University of Copenhagen.

Contrary to current cost models for lowering greenhouse gases emissions and fighting climate change, a group of researchers from the University of Cambridge conclude that even very stringent reductions of can create a macroeconomic benefit, if governments go about it the right way.

“Where many current calculations get it wrong is in the assumption that more stringent measures will necessarily raise the overall cost, especially when there is substantial unemployment and underuse of capacity as there is today”, explains Terry Barker, Director of Cambridge Centre for Climate Change Mitigation Research (4CMR), Department of Land Economy, University of Cambridge and a member of the Scientific Steering Committee of the Congress.